Citation

You are here: Home / Citation
International Dental & Medical Journal of Advanced Research (2016), Vol 2
1.REVIEW ARTICLE
Designing and validation of questionnaire
Sandesh Jain, Saumya Dubey, Sandhya Jain
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–3] [No. of Hits: 5510]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.39

ABSTRACT

A designing questionnaire which is worthwhile and easy to interpret and generalizable is an art, and it requires careful planning. The usefulness of questionnaire lies in quantifying the ? ndings of initial exploratory phase. Questions may be open ended (descriptive answer type) or close ended (Y/N type). For a questionnaire to be valid, it should be understood by subjects/participants correctly to answer. Thus, the relevant answer is sought. Questions should be simple and unambiguous. Questions should be devised using all concepts related to aim, and validity and reliability of the questions should be checked by pilot study before conducting the main study.

Keywords: Designing, questionnaire, validity

How to cite this article: Jain S, Dubey S, Jain S. Designing and validation of questionnaire. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-3.

2.REVIEW ARTICLE
Attachments used with implant supported overdenture
Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi, Amal Fatthy Kaddah
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–5] [No. of Hits: 14557]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.45

ABSTRACT

Conventional complete denture is the traditional treatment plan for the completely edentulous patient. Unfortunately, this treatment option has several complications, especially for the lower denture. The advance of a dental implant with attachment systems resolves many of these issues, particularly that related to the denture retention and stability. A wide variety of commercially available attachment systems is used to connect implants to overdentures. Most commonly used attachments include stud, bar, magmatic, and telescopic attachments. Each of these types has owned its advantages, disadvantages, and special requirements efficiently to be used. The selection of attachment system depend on, amount of retention needed, available inter arch space, manual dexterities of the patient, skills of the dentist and finally the cost. In this article, authors reviewed the literature concerning the types, designs, and requirements of attachments systems.

Keywords Attachment system, dental implant, overdenture

How to cite this article: Alqutaibi AY, Kaddah AF. Attachments used with implant supported overdenture. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-5.

3.REVIEW ARTICLE
Scaffolds for dental pulp tissue regeneration: A review
Saaid Ayesh Alshehadat, Htun Aung Thu, Suzina Sheikh Abdul Hamid, Asma Abdullah Nurul, Samsudin Abdul Rani, Azlina Ahmad
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–12] [No. of Hits: 4262]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.36

ABSTRACT

A key of success in tissue regeneration is the use of a suitable scaffold either to carry specialized cells ex vivo or to orchestrate and differentiate the homing of endogenous cells in vivo. This review aims to elucidate the materials that have been studied for dental pulp tissue regeneration/engineering and summarize their properties, advantages, and disadvantages. PubMed databases were searched for engineering, pulp regeneration, endodontics, and stem cells) without time restrictions. The search was restricted to articles published in English language. When necessary, additional searches for the structure, properties and history of the specific scaffold materials were achieved. Data from clinical, in vivo and in vitro studies were extracted, classified and reviewed. By providing an overview of possible scaffolds for pulp tissue regeneration, we aim to improve the understanding of the requirements of the clinical application of regenerative endodontics.

Keywords Dental pulp regeneration, dental tissue engineering, regenerative endodontics, scaffolds

How to cite this article: Alshehadat SA, Aung Thu H, Hamid SSA, Nurul AA, Rani SA, Ahmad A. Scaffolds for dental pulp tissue regeneration: A review. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2: 1-12.

4.REVIEW ARTICLE
Apoptosis detection modalities: A brief review
K. Shwetha Nambiar, Veda Hegde
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–5] [No. of Hits: 7463]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.53

ABSTRACT

Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a specific cellular event with distinct morphological, histological, molecular characteristics, and biochemical mechanisms. It plays an important role in normal turnover of the cell, development, and its function. Inadequate apoptosis (either too little or too much) is one of the major causes for various pathologies such as neurodegenerative disorders, ischemic, autoimmune diseases, and various forms of cancer. Since controlled apoptotic programs can produce changes in cell death pattern, the genes, and proteins that regulate apoptosis are potential future drug targets. Hence, detection of apoptotic cells will pave a new path for cancer diagnostics, prognosis, and therapy. The aim of this review article is to discuss various methods of apoptosis detection, from traditional approaches to recent advanced molecular methods.

Keywords: Apoptosis, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling

How to cite the article: Nambiar KS, Hegde V. Apoptosis detection modalities: A brief review. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-5

Received: 17 November 2016;

Accepted: 23 December 2016

5.REVIEW ARTICLE
Diagnostic aids in detection of oral precancer and cancer: Past to present
K. Shwetha Nambiar, Vanishri C. Haragannavar, Dominic Augustine, S. V. Sowmya, Roopa S. Rao
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–7] [No. of Hits: 6631]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.47

ABSTRACT

Oral carcinogenesis is a stepwise accumulation of genetic damage over time. The older cancer diagnostic aids had less specificity, were time-consuming, and produced inter-observer bias. Technological and therapeutic advances in the recent years have helped to diagnose and treat this disease at an early stage. Advances in molecular biology over the past decade have helped us to enhance our understanding of the complex interplay between genetic, transcriptional, and translational alterations in human cancers. This review provides a summary of all the diagnostic modalities that were used earlier and the newer more advanced techniques with merits and demerits of each technique described briefly.

Keywords Genomics, microarrays, next generation sequencing, polymerase chain reaction, proteomics

How to cite this article: Nambiar KS, Haragannavar VC, Augustine D, Sowmya SV, Rao RS. Diagnostic aids in detection of oral precancer and cancer: Past to present. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-7.

6.ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Effect of melatonin on osseointegration of immediate loading implant supported mandibular over denture: Randomized clinical trail
Doaa Amr A. Heshmat Rostom, Alaa Aboul Ela, Mohamed Farouk Abdalla
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–5] [No. of Hits: 3608]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.55

ABSTRACT

Background: In the recent years, immediate loading of implant is very demanding to shorten the rehabilitation time. Some authors claimed that Melatonin induces bone formation, increase bone density, and bone implant contact. The aim of this study is to assess the eff ect of local melatonin administration on bone density around immediateloaded implant supported over denture.

Materials and Methods: Eight completely edentulous patients were selected. The Patient’s age ranged between 55 to 65 years old. The study was split-mouth technique, each patient served as his own control, the study group (topical application of melatonin in the implant side), the control group (no melatonin in the other implant side of the same patients).Immediately after the implant placement, implant stability test was performed using the Osstell Monitor, and Digora system was used for assessing the bone density changes. The Radiographic bone density measurements, implant stability assessment, and implant survival were performed at time of loading then at 3, 6 and 12 months after loading.

Results: A high statistically signifi cant diff erence in bone density and implant stability in the immediately loaded implants with local melatonin application (P = 0.001).

Conclusion: The local melatonin administration increase bone density and improve the osseointegration processes around immediate-loaded implant supported over dentures.

Keywords: Bone density, immediate loading implant, melatonin, osseointegration

How to cite this article: Rostom DA, Ela AA, Abdalla MF. Effect of melatonin on osseointegration of immediate loading implant supported mandibular over denture: Randomized clinical trail. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-5

Received: 18 November 2016;

Accepted: 25 December 2016

7.REVIEW ARTICLE
Lasers in dental implantology: A review
Renu Gupta, R. P. Luthra, Shikha Gupta
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–5] [No. of Hits: 8981]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.46

ABSTRACT

Dental implants have revolutionized the field of dentistry over several decades and are proven to be a legitimate treatment option. As practice of dental implants became more common worldwide, the means of its improvement should be taken into consideration. Lasers can be particularly useful for delivering and supporting the dental implant treatment. Dental lasers have numerous applications in the field of dentistry, and this parallel expansion of laser dentistry and implant dentistry is quite discernible. Advent of different laser systems has a considerable spectrum of application in soft and hard tissues. Innumerable applications of dental lasers have been proposed for clinical use ranging from pre-surgical preparation, placement, second stage recovery, and gingival management, through the treatment of peri-implantitis. Along with these, there lie other benefits such as ablation of target tissues and ability to reduce bacterial contamination. Various wavelengths of dental lasers discovered so far, not all of them are of use in implantology. A laser works primarily through stimulated emission. The light reaches biological tissues and get reflected, absorbed, or scattered in surrounding tissues. Lasers primarily used in the field of implant dentistry are solid state lasers Nd:YAG, Nd:YAP, Er:YAG, Er,Cr:YSGG, semiconductor diode lasers, and gas lasers such as carbon dioxide lasers. Some of these are used for soft-tissue applications having excellent coagulative properties and some works for hard-tissue application described below in this review. When compared to traditional methods, lasers are gentle, less invasive, and less painful. Various studies have documented the capacity of laser wavelength and laser parameters used in implantology. In addition, laser characteristics are important because of the different reactions, they can produce on implant surfaces. Therefore, proper knowledge of properties of lasers and its mode of action are also important for its advantageous use. The aim of this article is to debrief the application of lasers in implant dentistry in a comprehensive manner.

Keywords Dental implants, lasers, laser wavelengths, prosthetics

How to cite this article: Gupta R, Luthra RP, Gupta S. Lasers in dental implantology: A review. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-4.

8.REVIEW ARTICLE
Guideline for systematic reviews
Sandhya Jain, Neetu Sharma
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–10] [No. of Hits: 4895]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.48

ABSTRACT

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses form the basis for evidence-based dentistry. Evidence-based dentistry has become popular in recent years, which utilizes the best available research evidences with clinical experience and patient needs. In the hierarchy of studies, meta-analysis and systematic reviews occupy the highest levels. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are the essential tools as they help in summarizing diff erent available information reliably so as to draw the conclusion more accurately. A systematic review is the process of searching clinical evidence on a particular topic and selecting quality articles, appraising, and synthesizing to draw conclusion. Conducting a systematic review involves proper methodology as described in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis (PRISMA).[1] There are some guidelines that should be followed by conducting and reporting systematic reviews. Items are described in sufficient details with clarity somewhere in the text. These guidelines were provided by a group of diff erent review authors, methodologists, and medical editors, etc. The original guidelines for conducting a systematic review were given by QUOROM quality of reporting meta-analysis. After improving QUOROM, a new guideline has been developed as the PRISMA.[1] This is essential for transparent reporting of systematic review so as that one can check its strength and weakness. The potential usefulness is compromised without proper key information. The rationale behind this article is to explain checklist items with appropriate dental example. This would help new researchers in better understanding of the proper methodology to conduct and report systematic reviews. Certain extensions to PRISMA guideline have also been given for improving systematic review such as PRISMA-Equity 2012, PRISMA-IPD, PRISMAAbstract, and PRISMA-Harm. To visit various extensions of the PRISMA, one can visit http://www.equator-network.org/?post-type=eq-guideline&eq-guideline-study-design=systematic-review-and-meta-analyses&eq-guideline-clinical-specialty=0&eq-guideline.

Keywords Meta-analysis, Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis, quality of reporting meta-analysis, systematic review

How to cite this article: Jain S, Sharma N. Guideline for systematic reviews. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2;1-10.

9.ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Evaluation of internal adaptation of full contour zirconia crowns versus veneered zirconia crowns: In vitro study
Abdulsattar Hasan Al-Baadani
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–6] [No. of Hits: 1924]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.37

ABSTRACT

Background: The fit of zirconia crowns varies with the variation in the finish line design. In this study, we evaluate the internal adaptation of full contour zirconia crowns to veneered zirconia with two different finish line designs.

Materials and Methods: 24 dies were received 12 full contour zirconia crowns (Prettau) and 12 veneered zirconia crowns (ICE Zirconia). Each group will be subdivided into two equally subgroups: (Subgroup 1, n = 6) with shoulder finish (SH) line and (Subgroup 2, n = 6) with deep chamfer finish (CH) line. Measurements of internal fitness were recorded.

Results: The lowest overall mean value of internal adaptation was recorded with ICE Zirconia crowns with deep CH line design (74.6 µm ± 19.14), then with SH line design (93.40 µm ± 9.99), followed by Prettau zirconia crowns with deep CH line design (157 µm ± 27.25) and finally Prettau zirconia crowns with SH line design (181 µm ± 24.86).

Conclusions: The overall mean values of the internal adaptation were within the clinical acceptance range. The ICE Zirconia crowns recorded better overall internal adaptation values than Prettau crowns with both finish line designs.

Keywords Fit, full contour, internal adaptation, zirconia

How to cite this article: Al-Baadani AH. Evaluation of internal adaptation of full contour zirconia crowns versus veneered zirconia crowns: In vitro study. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-6.

10.CORRESPONDENCE
Platelet rich fibrin - The rescuer after evanescence of mineral trioxide aggregate placed in an immature tooth with a periapical lesion
Rani Samyukta Gajjela, Girija S. Sajjan, R. Kalyan Satish, K. Madhu Varma
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–3] [No. of Hits: 1795]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.38

ABSTRACT

The absence of a natural apical constriction in a nonvital young permanent tooth makes endodontic treatment a challenge. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is the material of choice for apical barrier techniques. This paper reports a case of the immature permanent maxillary left central incisor, which presented pulp necrosis secondary to dental trauma and was treated by apexification with white MTA apical plugging followed by conventional root canal therapy. The operative procedures are described, and the technique is discussed. As purulent exudate was observed from the root canal, calcium hydroxide intracanal medicament was placed for a week, followed by MTA apexification at a later date. After 2 days, on clinical examination, hard resistance was not felt and radiographic examination revealed that MTA was missing. The acidic pH and increased protein content of the periapical lesion might have resulted in the acidic dissolution of MTA. So for effective management, in the present case report one step apexification using MTA as an apical barrier and autologous platelet rich fibrin as an internal matrix was done which resulted in better healing.

Keywords: Apexification, mineral trioxide aggregate, open apex, platelet rich fibrin

How to cite this article: Gajjela RS, Sajjan GS, Satish RK, Varma KM. Platelet rich fibrin - The rescuer after evanescence of mineral trioxide aggregate placed in an immature tooth with a periapical lesion. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-3.

11.ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Asymmetrical root resorption in primary mandibular molars: Prevalence and determinants factors
Raquel Gonçalves Vieira-Andrade, Clarissa Lopes Drumond, Maressa Santos Araújo, Gilsimary Santana Santos, Thiago Fonseca-Silva, Maria Letícia Ramos-Jorge
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–5] [No. of Hits: 1973]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.40

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study was designed to determine the prevalence of asymmetrical root resorption and associated factors in primary mandibular molars in children aged 3-12 years.

Design: A cross-sectional study was carried out with a representative sample of 1068 molars evaluated using 671 radiographs from 453 children. Age, dental history, and medical history were recorded using a questionnaire administered to the children’s parents/caregivers. Asymmetrical root resorption, dental crown status (sound, caries without pulp involvement, caries with pulp involvement, and evidence of restoration), periradicular lesion, and pulpotomy or pulpectomy were determined. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, the Chi-square test and a multivariate logistic regression (P < 0.05).

Results: The prevalence rate of asymmetrical root resorption was 3.8%. The 8-12 years age bracket (odds ratio [OR]: 5.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.3-15.1; P < 0.001) and presence of pulpotomy (OR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.1-7.4; P < 0.05) were predictors of the occurrence of asymmetrical root resorption in primary mandibular molars. In conclusion, the prevalence of asymmetrical root resorption was low.

Conclusion: Child1’s age and the presence of pulpotomy were associated with a greater occurrence of this type of resorption.

Keywords Child, epidemiology, molar, root resorption, tooth

How to cite this article: Vieira-Andrade RG, Drumond CL, Araújo MS, Santos GS, Fonseca-Silva T, Ramos-Jorge ML. Asymmetrical root resorption in primary mandibular molars: Prevalence and determinants factors. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-5.

12.ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Remineralization of bleached enamel with novel nutraceutical agents: An in vitro study
Girija S. Sajjan, Revathi Indukuri, Tanikonda Rambabu, Kanumuri Madhu Varma, Rajulapati Kalyan Satish
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–5] [No. of Hits: 1722]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.41

ABSTRACT

Background/Purpose: The effect of bleaching agents on dental hard tissues was uncertain. Moreover, reverting the side effects caused by bleaching using nutraceuticals as remineralizing agents remained uninvestigated. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 22% carbamide peroxide (CP) on the mineral content of enamel and to evaluate the remineralization of bleached enamel after treatment with three different remineralizing agents.

Materials and Methods: A total of 30 extracted human maxillary incisors were selected, and their initial mineral content was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). All the specimens were bleached with 22% CP and their mineral content was reanalyzed. They were then randomly divided into three groups. Group A: Remineralization with casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), Group B: Remineralization with a 6.5% grape seed extract (GSE) solution prepared in phosphate buffer, and Group C: Remineralization with 6.5% wheat grass solution in phosphate buffer. Remineralization was carried out for 10 min, and EDX analysis was carried out again. Statistical analysis was done using oneway ANOVA and Student’s t-test.

Results: Bleaching with 22% CP significantly decreased the mineral content of the enamel. All the three remineralizing agents significantly increased the mineral content. Group A (CPP-ACP) showed the highest remineralization than Group B and C but was not statistically significant.

Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that bleaching with CP decreases the mineral content of enamel and agents such as CPPACP, GSE, and wheat grass help in remineralizing the bleached surface.

Keywords Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, nutraceutical, remineralization, vital bleaching

How to cite this article:Sajjan GS, Indukuri R, Rambabu T, Varma KM, Satish RK. Remineralization of bleached enamel with novel nutraceutical agents: An in in vitro study. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-5.

13.ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Inhibitory effects of ginger extract on Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus acidophilus
Ambika Murugesan, B. Sivapathasundharam
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–5] [No. of Hits: 7950]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.42

ABSTRACT

Background: The incidence of infections caused by yeast, particularly species of Candida and facultative anaerobic bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus acidophilus has increased dramatically during the past decade. Topical and systemic antifungal agents and anti microbial agents may be indicated to control oral candidiasis and periodontal and endodontic disease. The development of resistance is an emerging trend that may threaten the clinical eff ectiveness.

Aim: An in vitro study to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of ginger extract on Candida albicans, S. aureus, L. acidophilus, using five different polar organic solvents.

Materials and Methods: The crude solvent extracts of ginger were prepared and subjected to antimicrobial assay using the Agar disk diff usion method to determine the zone of inhibition. The solvent extract with a signifi cant zone of inhibition is subjected to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, to identify the bioactive constituent in the ginger extract.

Result: Hexane extract of ginger shows high antimicrobial property, and the bioactive component was found to be zingiberene.

Conclusion: The solvent extracts of ginger were proven to have eff ective antimicrobial property.

Keywords Antimicrobial activity, drug resistance, zingiberene

How to cite this article: : Murugesan A, Sivapathasundharam. Inhibitory effects of ginger extract on Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-5.

14.ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Assessment of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients with periodontitis: A three-way method using gingival crevicular, capillary, and venous blood
Gautami S. Penmetsa, J. Bharathi Devi, C. D. Dwarakanath
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–4] [No. of Hits: 3448]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.43

ABSTRACT

Background: To test the feasibility of using gingival crevice blood collected during routine periodontal examination and to estimate the blood glucose levels using glucometer (Accu-Chek Active).

Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients with a history diabetes mellitus and with chronic periodontitis were selected. From all, the patients fasting venous blood glucose was estimated. Blood oozing from gingival tissues during periodontal examination was collected on the strip of the glucose self-monitoring device (Accu-Chek). Then, the finger stick capillary blood was collected, and glucose levels were estimated using glucometer.

Results: The comparison between venous capillary and gingival crevicular showed a strong correlation with a P < 0.001.

Conclusion: The data from this study have shown that gingival crevicular blood collected during the periodontal examination may be used to analyse blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

Keywords Chronic periodontitis, diabetes mellitus, gingival crevicular blood glucose

How to cite this article: Penmetsa GS, Devi JB, Dwarakanath CD. Assessment of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients with periodontitis: A three-way method using gingival crevicular, capillary, and venous blood. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-4.

15.ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Insertion and removal effects of tooth supported overdentures on retention strength and fatigue resistance of attachment systems: An in vivo study
Sagar J. Abichandani, Neha Abichandani
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–6] [No. of Hits: 2019]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.44

ABSTRACT

Background: Semi-precision attachments require repeated replacements and servicing in use, so it is important to understand the time frame of this wear and its possible replacement for better patient compliance. This study was aimed to assess the retention strength and fatigue resistance of Rhein OT caps and Ceka sagix attachment in the patients.

Materials and Methods: Those patients who had tooth supported overdentures incorporating Sagix and Rhein attachments were shortlisted and classified based on the time frame of denture insertion into 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 years. An indigenous retention tester equipment (KS Enterprises, Bengaluru, India) was fabricated and calibrated to measure the force required to displace the overdenture giving the value of its retention which was further compared with the value of retention strength of newly inserted overdentures using both Sagix and Ceka attachment systems individually.

Results: The values were noted and subjected to statistical analysis for evaluating the retention loss and development of fatigue. Repeated measures of ANOVA were used which provided a statistically significant relation between the retention values of both the attachment systems on tooth supported overdentures when compared with the time period of its use in the oral cavity.

Conclusion: Sagix and Rhein attachment systems showed adequate retention values up to the period of 2-3-year with a subsequent reduction in the retention values but no component fracture of the attachment systems.

Keywords Attachments, fatigue, retention, tooth supported overdentures

How to cite this article: Abichandani SJ, Abichandani N. Insertion and removal effects of tooth supported overdentures on retention strength and fatigue resistance of attachment systems: An in vivo study. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-6.

16.ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Oral hygiene status in South West coastal district of India
Mahalaxmi Yelapure, Mithra Hegde
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–4] [No. of Hits: 2980]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.49

ABSTRACT

Background: To study and compare the oral hygiene status in rural and peri-urban locations of South-west coastal district in India and to study the eff ect of age, gender, location, occupation, brushing habits, and diet on the oral hygiene status.

Materials and Methods: A total of 2000 patients visiting the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics of the Institute and the rural satellite centers of the same institute were randomly selected and included in the study. The oral hygiene status of each patient was recorded using the oral hygiene index-simplified; under proper illumination with a mouth mirror and explorer. The data were then coded and the oral hygiene status was evaluated and analyzed according to age, gender, diet, location, and occupation using Chi-square analysis test.

Results: It was seen that younger age group, urban, literate and people who brushed twice daily had better oral hygiene.

Conclusion: It could be concluded that higher levels of oral hygiene among the young, urban, and literate population was seen because of oral health maintenance by regular oral cleansing at personal level as well as by trained personnel. Hence, health education and health promotion are indispensable in achieving this target.

Keywords Age, diet, oral hygiene, rural, urban

How to cite this article: Yelapure M, Hegde M. Oral hygiene status in South West coastal district of India. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-4

17.PERSPECTIVE
Markers shaping the future of preventive dentistry
Yujvender Singh, Anupriya Bugalia, Eby Aluckal, Abraham Kunnilathu
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–4] [No. of Hits: 2187]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.50

ABSTRACT

Detecting pathologies at their earliest stages can significantly affect patient discomfort, prognosis, therapeutic intervention, survival rates, and recurrence. The use of tissue biomarkers in basic and clinical research and even in clinical practice not only became very common but also their presence as primary endpoints in clinical trials are now very well accepted. The use of tissue biomarkers, and mainly laboratory-measured biomarkers, in clinical set up is somewhat newer, and the suitable approaches to this practice are still in the process of development and refinement. This review highlights contemporary innovations and explores recent discoveries about markers in lesions of oral cavity.

Keywords Antigen, intracellular, oral lesions, tissue markers

How to cite this article: Singh Y, Bugalia A, Aluckal E, Kunnilathu A. Markers shaping the future of preventive dentistry. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-4.

18.ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Evaluation of quality of life of maxillectomy patients after prosthetic obturator rehabilitation
Renu Gupta, R. P. Luthra, Shikha Gupta
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–4] [No. of Hits: 2550]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.51

ABSTRACT

Background: Surgical resection of orofacial neoplasms has a profound impact on the quality of life (QOL) for patients and their families. Maxillectomy defects are most commonly rehabilitated using obturator prosthesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate and evaluate the QOL of patients with maxillofacial defects after maxillectomy and prosthodontic therapy with obturator prosthesis. QOL is an important consideration that influences the living conditions of society.

Material and Methods: About 16 out of 20 patients were included in the study. The QOL of these patients who underwent maxillectomy and prosthodontic therapy was assessed by applying a standard questionnaire, Obturator Functional Scale.

Results: QOL after prosthetic obturator rehabilitation was assessed to be 59.9 ± 3.7% on average. QOL of obturator patients was not signifi cantly related to age (P = 0.9), and gender (P = 0.320). The extent of therapy was correlated positively with QOL. A signifi cantly better average rating was found in patient who underwent surgery (64.75 ± 1.2), followed by patients with surgery + radiotherapy (60.95 ± 2.02) and surgery + radiotherapy + chemotherapy (55 ± 2.36) with a P = 0.006. QOL was also significantly related to educational status (P = 0.001) in contrast to other parameters like age and gender.

Conclusion: Orofacial rehabilitation of patients with maxillofacial defects using obturator prosthesis is an appropriate treatment modality. To improve the situation of patients before and after maxillectomy, sufficient information about treatment, adequate psychological care, and speech therapy should be provided. The significance of sound functioning of obturator prosthesis for QOL was intensified by the findings of this study and confirmed the results of similar studies.

Keywords: Maxillectomy, obturator prosthesis, prosthodontic rehabilitation, quality of life

How to cite this article: Gupta R, Luthra RP, Gupta S. Evaluation of quality of life of maxillectomy patients after prosthetic obturator rehabilitation. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-4.

19.ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Outcome of nonsurgical endodontic treatment: A 5-year recall
Abdulaziz S. Abu-Melha, Mohammed Thamer Alqahtani, Nawaf Abdulrahman Almufareh
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–3] [No. of Hits: 3979]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.52

ABSTRACT

Background: Prognosis of nonsurgical endodontic treatment has been extensively studied over the last decades; however, the data obtained is insuffi cient. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of initial endodontic treatment, and tooth retention over 5 years.

Materials and Methods: In this study, the treatment database of the King Khalid University Dental Clinics (KKUCD) is used to identify patient’s undergone nonsurgical endodontic treatment in the year 2009. 779 patients were treated by students, interns, and specialists in KKUCD. 205 patients (217 teeth) were recalled and examined their teeth presence (retention), endodontic lesion healing status, and medical history status.

Results: Among the 217 teeth, 208 were retained and 9 were extracted in 5 years. The 217 teeth, 34 treated by specialists, 90 by interns, and 93 by students. The 9 extracted teeth were 3 treated by specialists, 1 by interns, and 5 by students. The 9 extracted teeth were 4 maxillary premolars, 2 maxillary molars, 2 mandibular premolars, and 1 mandibular anterior. Using Chi-square tests, survival endodontic cases which had uncertain to successful endodontic healing are 27 treated by specialists, 86 by interns, and 75 by students. There was a signifi cant diff erence (P = 0.000) in endodontic success and survivability between the normal medical status and insulin-dependent diabetes patients.

Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the survivability of nonsurgical endodontic treatment is very highly predictable 90%. Prosthodontics consideration is highly important since all extracted teeth in the study were not crowned. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment within insulin-dependent diabetes patients has fair to poor prognosis, which shows a less rate of success in comparison to other compromised patients.

Keywords Nonsurgical treatment, outcome of endodontic treatment, root canal therapy

How to cite this article: Abu-Melha AS, Alqahtani MT, Almufareh NA. Outcome of nonsurgical endodontic treatment: A 5-year recall. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-3.

20.REVIEW ARTICLE
Journal club: A tool to update skills
Sandhya Jain, Ravikant Shah
[Year:2016] [Month:January-December] [Volume:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1–5] [No. of Hits: 4565]
  • PDF
  • |
  • Abstract
  • |
  • DOI : 10.15713/ins.idmjar.54

ABSTRACT

The way of learning and upgrading knowledge, skills has been changed. Nowadays, efforts have been shifted from single handed learning process to group learning process with an advantage that one can critically analyze, discuss, and upgrade with the knowledge and advancements in their fields. “Journal Club” word itself explains that a group of people gather regularly to discuss, and critically evaluate the recent advancements and researches in medical and dental education. Periodic evaluation of the conference and the institution of appropriate changes ensure that the journal club remains a valuable and successful part of the training program. Goal of almost all journal clubs in training programs is to keep residents up to date on the literature; the importance of this goal varies between programs. A clinician describes a clinical problem at the end of one journal club meeting. At the next journal club, some systematic reviews are presented on that subject and the evidence is evaluated.

Keywords: Art, journal club, tool, update skills, upgrade skills

How to cite this article: Jain S, Shah R. Journal club: A tool to update skills. Int Dent Med J Adv Res 2016;2:1-5.

Received 26: October 2016;

Accepted 29: December 2016